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Unpopular Opinions Blackshirt 09/11/2019 (Wed) 15:01:16 ID: 44881c No.87
Post your unpopular opinions here
Me:
>Islam is actually pretty based and Islam minus Africanization would be a net benefit to the West
>there is nothing wrong with having more than one wife
>Tarrant is overrated
>Hitler had no chance of winning, but was still based overall
>>4508 I tried to discuss things with you guys on non-antagonistic grounds, but those have been steadily rebuked. This rhetoric you've compelled me to use falls squarely on your shoulders and is wholly your doing. Hitler was a faggot, you are a faggot and you fucking cowards prove it everytime you ignore, jest or run from my posts. There are a couple exceptions but most of you are spineless, brainless trash who should've been aborted.
>>4509 Stay mad faggot
>>4506 I wasn't referring to the excerpt, but the character itself. >Other men above Time were people like Jesus, or the Buddha, both of whom offered paths out of this world There is a very easy way to find that path, in fact it happens automatically after a while. What they tried to teach (although I'm skeptical in the case of Jesus since he was a kike) is that the world doesn't have to be this way, and that one might understand how the reality works on a whole. Trying to go out while still alive is a degeneracy. >>4509 >everytime you ignore, jest or run from my posts Such as?
>>4502 >It's liberating in the same sense as death is. They are disintegrating everything that makes a man so all that remains is a dead, hollow husk or a tortured, abominable freak. correct. a man cannot fulfill a female svadharma, just as a woman cannot fill ours, and attempts to do so are futile. it's no wonder that the tranny suicide rate is many times the average. >It's like thinking that your arms are oppressing you because you have to drag them with your body so you cut them off in order to liberate yourself from their weight. it's also like thinking your foreskin is bad for you when it's a perfectly natural appendage, so you have it amputated. however, this is a tangent. >There is nothing priestly about them, they are the exact opposite. They have observed certain practical side-effects of religions and utilize them to their ends. yes, they're the opposite, you could also call them anti-priests. while they lack priestly qualities, they fill a similar cultural role. like the priest, they use their knowledge, eloquence, and ritual training (eg how to act on tv), but unlike the priest, they use these abilities to deceive the people rather than lead them to truth. >>4496 >media I realized this when I compared the proper roles in society to their inverted, corrupted forms under kali yuga. in a dharmic society, there would still be NPCs, but they'd be led towards the right path as much as possible, rather than manipulated and led astray. as for gov't oversight of media, both private and public sectors can be compromised by vested interests. instead of a free press, we have a propaganda ministry. in order to have a press that fulfills its proper function, we need society as a whole to function properly. >Aristotle keep in mind, bondage in ancient Greece varied quite a bit. there were tutors, galley slaves, helots (who were essentially serfs controlled by the Spartans), who worked under different conditions. slaves were often considered part of a household, and thus had some basic legal protections. also, bondage could be imposed as a legal punishment, and I assume that's what Aristotle meant by νόμος as opposed to φύσις. >early modern West the West achieved great things during that era, such as colonization and classical music. however, it seems that the Protestant Reformation was very de-stabilizing. keep in mind, there's a major distinction between the early modern period, and the techno-industrial modern world that arose from three revolutions fomented by the West: the atlantic/political revolution, the scientific revolution, and the industrial revolution. these were all great achievements in their own way, but ultimately set us on a wild, unstable course, far more turbulent than the early modern world, which was already a departure from medieval stability. industry and science can be positive things if developed properly, but they've veered off course. science in particular is a casualty of kali yuga, being employed to buttress ideological dogma and advance coomer/consoomer culture, rather than investigate truth and reality in a rational manner. >I don't have much to comment on in the rest of your post, and that is not because I am ignoring it, but because we are 100% in agreement and I have nothing to add, especially in regards to your observations on the consequences of the blending of roles, Cultural Marxists and the importance of following our svadharma. I've always implicitly understood these things, and never quite believed in the doctrines of equality that I was taught. it's only recently that I can articulate these ideas and place them in a proper framework.
>>4514 >Such as? I’m thinking the guy you are responding to is the faggot in the Islam thread who has been crying about no one responding to his boring posts
>>4514 >What they tried to teach (although I'm skeptical in the case of Jesus since he was a kike) is that the world doesn't have to be this way, and that one might understand how the reality works on a whole. Exactly. I'm very skeptical of Jesus as well, but I have been meaning to explore at some point whether Jews such as (((Saul of Tarsus))) were the corrupters of his teachings, or if they merely misunderstood the deeper meanings to what he taught as a man above Time. In particular I am interested in whether Jesus was a mischling, given that the Jews say in the Talmud that Jesus was a bastard child of Mary and a Roman soldier named Pantera. Celsus apparently held this account to be true as well. I read a book recently that said Jesus was not a Christian, but in fact a esoteric guru-like figure. I'll see if that has any fruit to it in time though. >>4515 >also, bondage could be imposed as a legal punishment, and I assume that's what Aristotle meant by νόμος as opposed to φύσις. Yeah I think prisoners of war were also included under slaves by convention as opposed to by nature. And slavery in ancient Greece definitely was fairly diverse like you pointed out. I'm admittedly still working through Aristotle's Politics as I write these things and so the parts I've read so far are mostly on household slaves, but I know that some city states had state-owned slaves and many other types. > science in particular is a casualty of kali yuga, being employed to buttress ideological dogma and advance coomer/consoomer culture, rather than investigate truth and reality in a rational manner. I think the way that the newest discoveries and research are being applied is definitely a sign of the Kali Yuga as well. Like you said it's being used to advance degenerate and materialistic ways of life and is one of the prime forces in disrupting more healthy and natural modes of living as we've mentioned early in this thread, though it's important not to downplay the role of a certain (((race))) in accelerating many of the resulting problems. >I've always implicitly understood these things, and never quite believed in the doctrines of equality that I was taught. it's only recently that I can articulate these ideas and place them in a proper framework. It's been largely the same for me, though I blindly followed what I was taught by public edjewcation for a while on prejudice and racism, but over time my experiences non-whites eroded any and all belief I had in such ideas, laying the foundation for my later redpilling. So I slowly came around to such ideas and recently, much like you, began to learn of the ways that men in the past used to view things such as hierarchy and inequality, along with the specific terms that they used (like dharma – I've been perhaps a little too overzealous with spreading that one, just look at what it says on the top of every page now "/liberty/ - The most dharmapilled board on Jewlay.World" kek – still I think the concept is extremely important to our circles even if referred to differently, and the etymology of the term and its various senses only reinforce this with me.) National Socialism harmonizes perfectly with dharma – a concept that is not Indian, not Hindu, not Buddhist, not Jain, etc, but eminently traditional and self-evidently universal (not in the pozzed sense) in scope.
>>4519 >the Jews say in the Talmud that Jesus was a bastard child of Mary and a Roman soldier named Pantera. like many other things in the Talmud, this is a lie. if Jesus were the son of a Roman soldier, this would've conferred citizenship on him, which in turn would've exempted him from crucifixion, as only slaves and subjects could be crucified under Roman law. >Yeah I think prisoners of war were also included under slaves by convention as opposed to by nature. And slavery in ancient Greece definitely was fairly diverse like you pointed out. I'm admittedly still working through Aristotle's Politics as I write these things and so the parts I've read so far are mostly on household slaves, but I know that some city states had state-owned slaves and many other types. the history of slavery is generally not widely known, and that's especially true of ancient Greece. there have been many forms of bondage, under varying conditions and degrees of severity. while the slaves working on triremes or in mines faced harsh conditions, many other slaves were better off. there's a general perception of 'slavery' referring to the most severe forms of chattel slavery, when there's much more to the story. >I think the way that the newest discoveries and research are being applied is definitely a sign of the Kali Yuga as well. Like you said it's being used to advance degenerate and materialistic ways of life and is one of the prime forces in disrupting more healthy and natural modes of living as we've mentioned early in this thread, though it's important not to downplay the role of a certain (((race))) in accelerating many of the resulting problems. for sure. I wanted to draw a distinction between original Western science and its current institutional form. at first, it was a disciplined, rational approach to understanding reality, which made major inroads in numerous fields of study. but now, it's compromised by both dogmatic ideology and hedonism. to give examples, scientific institutions are used to prop up the global warming hoax, with the claim that 'scientists say this, therefore it's true', a dogmatic attitude which fundamentally contradicts the scientific method. of course, only research that shills for the narrative gets funded and published, and anyone who goes against the consensus is risking their career. as for hedonism, it's absurd that people should get advanced training and education in medical school solely to create fake breasts and alter appearances with plastic surgery; this is pouring resources into pure vanity. we see dogma and hedonism combined in transgender surgery, warping the bodies of the mentally ill in order to enable and encourage their delusions. all this is consistent with kali yuga. dharma is a profound concept, and bantz from other boards won't change that. it may be a sanskrit word, but the idea was upheld by many historical societies, ranging from Europe to Japan, as I mentioned earlier. my first redpill was reading Thomas Sowell's Black Rednecks and White Liberals, particularly the chapter The Real History of Slavery, where he describes how slavery and the slave trade were widespread throughout history. I had only learned about American slavery and the Triangle Trade in school. all the rest, the Crimean Khanate capturing and selling slaves to the Ottomans, the Barbary corsairs enslaving Europeans, the Arab slave trade of Africans, Greco-Roman, Chinese, Maori slavery, etc. all this I had to read for myself. while I had learned about abolitionism, I had to discover for myself the British campaign to end the slave trade. if they didn't tell me all this, what else was I not being told? that led me to questioning the propaganda. and likewise, my experience taught me that there are differences between people and cultures, and ideas like 'equality' and 'diversity' did not describe reality.
>>4523 >like many other things in the Talmud, this is a lie. if Jesus were the son of a Roman soldier, this would've conferred citizenship on him, which in turn would've exempted him from crucifixion, as only slaves and subjects could be crucified under Roman law. Interesting, I was unaware of this actually. Just goes to show how little I've looked into this so far beyond the surface level. But would this apply to a bastard child? >I wanted to draw a distinction between original Western science and its current institutional form. I think that distinction is important in science. We've of course seen people harassed out of their positions for stating things as self-evident as racial differences many times. Today it is truly indistinguishable from religion and is anything but a disciplined, rational approach to understanding reality, but like you said it's simply an instrument in the hands of globohomo to push its agenda. When in the past we had priests pushing certain narratives and formulating theological dogma and the peasants parroting half-digested exoteric versions of this, today we have wagecucks parroting half-digested and distorted versions of Jewish science. While both are condemnable, the former was far less sinister in its intentions and goals, I'd argue. This was far from a dharmic social order, but I doubt that it ever thought about wiping out all nations on Earth, mixing the higher with the lower and upturning all authority and natural ways of being as does modern scientism and its acolytes today. >it may be a sanskrit word, but the idea was upheld by many historical societies, ranging from Europe to Japan, as I mentioned earlier. The reason that it needs to be made more well-known in these circles, especially among pagans, is because it is the foundational belief of our pre-Abrahamic ancestors, the principal by which everything was judged in direct proportion to adherence to it. In truth it doesn't matter which term we use, but the dharma : adharma dichotomy (or whatever analogous terms) is crucial and must be distinguished from Abrahamic notions like sin in the popular sense. For something to be adharmic means nothing more than non-conformity with the nature of beings, disequilibrium, a rupture of harmony, an upsetting of authority and hierarchy. The opposite, dharma, living in Truth, etc, is the opposite of this. As we've discussed, we've seen the results of this non-conformity with the nature of beings being taken as the highest good. I'd really like to pour a lot of time one day here and really look into the different correspondences to dharma that pre-Abrahamic societies have had. There's of course The Dharma Manifesto, which is a fantastic book, but I only wish that it had gone far more in depth and taken the conclusions slightly further in some places. I don't claim to know more about the concept than a Vedic acharya with decades of experience and practice under his belt, but it might be an interesting thing to explore. I know for a fact that the author was holding back a bit from watching his videos.
>>2945 Fallout 3 had the best setting though it was really dark and depressive.
>>4527 >Interesting, I was unaware of this actually. Just goes to show how little I've looked into this so far beyond the surface level. But would this apply to a bastard child? I'd have to dig further to be sure. either way, it seems like an unlikely story, especially given the source. >scientism that's a good word to describe the corrupted, dogmatic institution that has taken the place of science for the most part. yes, climate change and trannyism are being used to push globohomo, with institutional science used to back their agenda. scientism is designed to sway the masses, who often accept it at face value instead of doing their own research. this is especially true of the 'I fucking love science' soys. they don't love it, they barely know what it is. >dharma also a good word, probably the best word to describe natural order, hierarchy, and harmony. there seems to be some similarity with the eastern concept of Tao/Dao (道) but also differences. and yes, this must be distinguished from the Abrahamic/Levantine mode of thought which is a pervasive influence on us. as I said in another discussion, even when people attempt to convert to Paganism, Buddhism, or another non-abrahamic faith, many Abrahamic ideas remain embedded in them i.e. sin, heaven & hell, God & Satan, etc. it can be difficult to get over those ingrained assumptions.
>>4566 >either way, it seems like an unlikely story, especially given the source. I think the only reason that it should not be discarded out of hand is due to its mentioning by Celsus, who was obviously a non-Jewish pagan. The claim seems to be earlier than existence of the Talmud. Honestly though whether it is true or not doesn’t concern me much. Either way I have never had any great attraction to the figure of Jesus or anything he preached. The Sermon on the Mount in particular repulses me. The ideals of the New Testament applied to society would be completely against the Natural Order because it is fundamentally the dharma of a person in the life-stage of a renunciation (a sannyasi in Sanskrit) that is preached: <Sannyasa is a form of asceticism, is marked by renunciation of material desires and prejudices, represented by a state of disinterest and detachment from material life, and has the purpose of spending one's life in peaceful, love-inspired, simple spiritual life. Sounds pretty fitting to me. Likewise at this stage one loses his caste. Of course only particular aspects of this life have been brought over into Christianity – no one can seriously argue that 99.9% of Christians truly “renounce anything”. It’s another path out of this Earth, becoming above Time, a stage not meant to be applied to the whole of life as a great ideal, but instead taken by some as the culmination of a life lived in various other stages such as a student, a householder, a retired householder, and then final the world-renouncing hermit. Jesus may have adopted this state at some early date, and it is possible that he had reached great spiritual attainment and was merely misinterpreted in his teachings, but regardless he was no Son of God or figure worthy of elevation above any other sages throughout time. It is only worth researching Jesus to see if any of this speculation bears fruit, and whether it can be used to either turn these people’s Christianity into something more )))positive((( or bring them to true paganism, not shallow exoteric LARP. >even when people attempt to convert to Paganism, Buddhism, or another non-abrahamic faith, many Abrahamic ideas remain embedded in them i.e. sin, heaven & hell, God & Satan, etc. it can be difficult to get over those ingrained assumptions. It’s definitely difficult, and I say this as a former atheist (and before that a Christian but only the kind who showed up at church occasionally in childhood). Even for atheists of course the whole society is thoroughly judaized and permeated with Abrahamic concepts. Like I’m sure you’d agree and like many others have said, the default mode of secular thought in our society is essentially Christianity stripped of religious-trappings.
>>4569 Christianity is very egalitarian, in that we are all considered equals before God, we are all sinners, each with a soul in need of redemption. if anything, being poor, low-status and servile makes it easier to enter the Kingdom of Heaven, while being rich, powerful and a leader puts you at a disadvantage. it is anti-dharmic. I think Jesus was enlightened, and was a great prophet. in fact, he was the most successful prophet of all, given the scope of his religion and the extent of his claims. Christianity is still the world's most dominant religion, it's thriving 2,000 years after its founding, and Jesus is worshipped as the Son of God. none of the other great founders claimed to BE divinity: Muhammad claimed to be a messenger or conduit of Allah, while the Buddha simply claimed to have achieved enlightenment; Jesus went beyond this to claim the godhead, and more than that, did so successfully. he achieved undeniable greatness. as to whether he really was the Son of God, I won't comment on that. yes, our society is pervaded with a sort of secular Christianity. as far as fixing its current form, there's alot of entrenched assumptions and inertia there, and I doubt you'd make much headway. I think paganism and dharma is the way forward, once that gets established, it should be easier for current Christianity to improve. for better or worse, the Christian religion is here to stay, and we'll have to work with this fact rather than against it.
>>4607 >if anything, being poor, low-status and servile makes it easier to enter the Kingdom of Heaven, while being rich, powerful and a leader puts you at a disadvantage. it is anti-dharmic. Reminds me of this – 1 Corinthians 1:27-29: <But God chose the foolish things of the world to shame the wise; God chose the weak things of the world to shame the strong. 28 God chose the lowly things of this world and the despised things—and the things that are not—to nullify the things that are, 29 so that no one may boast before him. I post this at Christians quite often but they never explain how this is not slave morality in its purest form. It is adharma put forth as a matter of policy and it’s not hard to see how it is still an influential mindset today in this world where every freak and degenerate is cherished and exalted, if not by God, but by this clownworld. In the near future Christianity is certainly here to stay, but it is continuously declining in both America and Europe. According to this link below now only 65% of Americans in 2018-19 consider themselves Christian, down 12% from a decade previous. Not surprisingly in connection with this, church attendence is declining. The number of “religiously unaffiliated” (i.e. atheists and agnostics) rising is slightly forboding to me, since this is more often that not the first step towards pushing even more depravity and relativism upon us. I often hear people counter this with “muh based right wing atheists exist too!” – which is undeniably true since I considered myself to be one at one point, but this is very rare statistically speaking. I know the situation is the same in Western Europe as well https://www.pewforum.org/2019/10/17/in-u-s-decline-of-christianity-continues-at-rapid-pace/ >I think paganism and dharma is the way forward, once that gets established, it should be easier for current Christianity to improve. for better or worse, the Christian religion is here to stay, and we'll have to work with this fact rather than against it. Definitely. I think paganism will become more and more popular in these circles, and hopefully so will notions of dharma, regardless of what it is called. As long as people begin to recognize an ordering principle and the need for a harmonically-organized society and a spiritual foundation we will be heading in the right direction. Hopefully a party or group of some kind gets set up with these goals explicitly in the future.
>>4612 yes, and <Matthew 5:4 <Blessed are the meek: for they shall possess the land. <Matthew 20:16 <So shall the last be first, and the first last. For many are called, but few chosen. slave morality pervades Christianity, there's no denying this. its egalitarian, adharmic outlook is paralleled by the modern Left. Christianity has been declining in the West for awhile, but it thrives in other regions, namely Latin America, Africa, and parts of Asia. it's still the world's largest religion, and I predict that it will continue to be a potent spiritual force far into the future. it survived early persecution, defeated its rivals in Late Antiquity, colonized nations around the world, and is still strong 2000 years later. Christianity should not be underestimated. whether you call it dharma or natural order, it's of fundamental importance. I think the state of Christianity in the West is in many ways a result of our cultural decline and increased pozzing. once the baseline of our society is improved by dharma, Christianity will also benefit. even if it has adharmic tenets, it's something we'll have to accommodate.
>>4655 >>4655 Even with decline it shouldn't be completely discounted. It's here to stay in one form or another for a very long time still for better or for worse, much like you say. Even if pagan-inspired forces were to come to power in a given Western country I doubt - if they were smart - that they would touch Christianity in any significant way, as it only creators martyrs. We all know how the Abrahamist, deep down, thirsts for martyrdom. I think there was a quote in Mein Kampf somewhere that said something to the effective that you can't persecute an idea out of existence, instead you need to present a better alternative. Of course we both think that a dharmic social order is this better alternative. Christianity is both a mix of adharmic and dharmic elements. If in anyway the latter can be nurtured it should be done somehow. >I think the state of Christianity in the West is in many ways a result of our cultural decline and increased pozzing. once the baseline of our society is improved by dharma, Christianity will also benefit. even if it has adharmic tenets, it's something we'll have to accommodate. I completely agree. I think it will take some for pagan-inspired worldviews to really mature and emerge into the mainstream in anyway though. It has undeniably been a persistent current in our circles, but I long for the day when it is preached openly and implemented on a national scale. All it takes is one individual who really intuitively grasps this worldview and can articulate it in such a way that it is an immensely attractive alternative and fulfilling spiritual path and Weltanschauung. Of course in the mean-time we should never sit idly by and wait for our saviors. "Kalki" will come one day, but action is always better than inaction, as we all know.
>>4668 Ethno-religions like paganism won't rise until they are expressly tied to fecundity and large families. It will have to reject birth control
>>4686 This won’t be hard to put forward as a position, it’s a natural corollary of our ethnonationalist views to cherish large families and healthy, sustainable birth-rates. Likewise birth-control is degenerate because it hinders such things. Of course though it’s one thing to advocate for this another to put it into practice. I want at least a half a dozen kids. We need to be making up for what leftists atheists and other NPC whites are failing at.
>>4696 >I want at least a half a dozen kids. I know you can do it, if you actively strive toward it with resolve. Best of luck anon.
>>4712 Best of luck to you as well, anon. I come from a small family so it's definitely something I've always wanted even ignoring white nationalism for a second. Truly the hardest part is finding a good wife. I only worry for what futures await them if nothing changes.
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>>4668 >We all know how the Abrahamist, deep down, thirsts for martyrdom. Jesus was a martyr, so in a sense, Christianity was founded on martyrdom. >>4686 in many ways, paganism was tied to public life. in antiquity, there was no separation of Church and State, no clear boundary between secular and religious. the gods pervaded society and were woven into the community. thus, paganism was especially vulnerable to societal collapse, whereas Christianity persisted underground and eventually triumphed. one of the challenges facing paganism today is that it's fractured and dispersed among small groups, when it's meant to be communally oriented.
>>4738 >Jesus was a martyr, so in a sense, Christianity was founded on martyrdom. Exactly, and it's not even an active martyrdom like Jihadis or Kamikaze pilots. It's almost wholly passive. The typical Christian does not want to die in battle forwarding the cause of his people (as in the Kamikaze example) or in defending and forwarding his religion. Wholly disconnecting myself from what Jihadis have done and are doing against white people for a moment, their warrior and martyr tradition is very admirable. I had long came to this belief intuitively but reading books such as Evola's Metaphysics of War helped further cement this belief. There is more overlap than one would at first think between these two and the true Aryan warrior (as opposed to the "citizen-soldier" of today) since the latter too is rooted in traditional and a far more spiritual conception of warfare.
>>4751 active vs passive martyrdom is a very important distinction. it's one thing to go into battle, accepting death as an outcome of struggle. it's quite another to quietly accept persecution and death out of pacifism. the latter is very Abrahamic in nature, while the former is aryan and dharmic. we see active martyrdom in the samurai ethos and other warrior traditions, and passive martyrdom in Jesus and the Christian saints who followed him. generally speaking, submission is characteristic of the Abrahamic faiths. while Islam does have a respectable warrior tradition, it also demands that Muslims submit to Allah and kowtow to Mecca every day, so the submissive influence is still there. likewise, when attending Church growing up, I would kneel in the pews as part of Mass. arguably the Jews also submit to their laws and talmud. in contrast, Buddhism (the dharmic religion I'm most familiar with) asks you to rise above cravings and worldly attachments, follow the noble eightfold path, and seek enlightenment. you are challenged to climb a mountain, rather than asked to submit. this seems to be a fundamental difference in character.
>>4860 >active vs passive martyrdom is a very important distinction. it's one thing to go into battle, accepting death as an outcome of struggle. it's quite another to quietly accept persecution and death out of pacifism. the latter is very Abrahamic in nature, while the former is aryan and dharmic. It reminds me of some of my favorite verses of the Bhagavad Gita. I don't want to quote dump, but it really goes to show how stark of a difference there is between the traditional Aryan conception of warfare and the Abrahamic: <(2.31) And as you discern your own dharma, you should not waver. For the warrior, there can be found nothing greater than battle for the sake of dharma <(2.33) If you will not engage in this fight for the sake of dharma, you will have shunned your own dharma and your good name, and shall cause harm. <(3.35) Better one's own dharma, even if ineffective, than the dharma of another, practiced well! Better death in one's own dharma! The dharma ovver of another brings on fear. I can't be the only one who sees how extremely radical conclusions can be drawn from such verses and what it legitimizes. The starkest of all contrasts can be seen in 11.33, which outright says "Prepare to fight and win glory. Conquer your enemies ". How stark of a contrast from the thoroughly "in Time" teaching of Jesus - "love your enemies"! This is why Savitri Devi has called the Gita the book of the Warrior Against Time, the book that teaches detached, selfless violence. >arguably the Jews also submit to their laws and talmud. Jews at least adhere to a tradition that affirms their supremacy and protects their race, making them, paradoxically, one of the least cucked Abrahamic religions. This, of course, is why the Jews are so dangerous. The Jews are of course a conniving and effeminate race, but where they lack in a warrior tradition, they can of course accomplish through backstabbing, flattery, subversion and degeneracy. They are the exact opposite of the Aryan, and their claims for "Chosenness" are fraudulent. The only thing they are "chosen" for is to serve as a parasite within nations, a force that advances the cause of adharma, the destruction of all beauty, life-affirmation and races, including themselves. As Hitler taught, the Jew will destroy itself in a orgy of bloodshed when their domination reaches its apex. One of the clearest signs of bluepilledness is thinking that any peace can be reached with this race. There are millenia-worth of examples to the contrary. >in contrast, Buddhism (the dharmic religion I'm most familiar with) asks you to rise above cravings and worldly attachments, follow the noble eightfold path, and seek enlightenment. you are challenged to climb a mountain, rather than asked to submit. this seems to be a fundamental difference in character. I'm attracted to some aspects of Buddhism as well, especially the interpretation of it that shows that the teachings of the Buddha are not pacifistic, humanistic or representing a doctrine of universal love and egalitarianism as it is often represented in the West today. This is a distortion. The true core of Buddhism is aristocratic, esoteric and accessible only to an elect few. Buddhist ethics cannot be reduced to the deontological slave ethics of (((Christianity))). Right conduct is purely instrumental. Follow it or do not follow it, stay asleep if you want as a samsaric NPC. Kamikaze pilots and Samurai represent true men who understood the elitist teachings of the Buddha. The Buddha’s basic teachings are redpilled. Even if one does not consider themself a Buddhist there is much good in the teachings that even a non-religious person can benefit from.
>>4865 >>4865 >It reminds me of some of my favorite verses of the Bhagavad Gita. I don't want to quote dump, but it really goes to show how stark of a difference there is between the traditional Aryan conception of warfare and the Abrahamic: yes, and you can also see this in bushido texts, particularly the Hagakure's famous opening lines (the way of the warrior is death), and Munenori's concept of the life-giving sword (in which violence can sometimes be used to preserve life). likewise, Buddhism has the concept of upaya/skillful means, where in certain situations, you can act in ways that would usually result in negative karma, but are justified by circumstance. >The Buddha’s basic teachings are redpilled. Even if one does not consider themself a Buddhist there is much good in the teachings that even a non-religious person can benefit from. yes indeed >Jews at least adhere to a tradition that affirms their supremacy and protects their race, making them, paradoxically, one of the least cucked Abrahamic religions. This, of course, is why the Jews are so dangerous. The Jews are of course a conniving and effeminate race, but where they lack in a warrior tradition, they can of course accomplish through backstabbing, flattery, subversion and degeneracy. that makes sense. it was tricky for me to fit the Jews into the 'submissive' ethos of Abrahamic religion, but this explains it.
>you can also see this in bushido texts, particularly the Hagakure's famous opening lines (the way of the warrior is death), and Munenori's concept of the life-giving sword (in which violence can sometimes be used to preserve life). I definitely had the Hagakure in mind when typing these quotes down. It's always interested me how much similarity there is between many warrior traditions. Contrary to what the (((culture industry))) sells us, the traditional warrior is not uncontrolled savagery and passions, but of course precisely the opposite - the true warrior is calm, controlled, and able to subordinate his individualistic tendencies or lower elements to principles, placing his svadharma above mere personhood. This is why Evola speaks of "warrior-like asceticism". It might not be totally coincidental that figures like Mahavira and Siddharta Gautama came from kshatriya lines in this context. Also I don't think I've heard of Munenori before. Has he written anything worth checking out? >likewise, Buddhism has the concept of upaya/skillful means, where in certain situations, you can act in ways that would usually result in negative karma, but are justified by circumstance. Didn't the Buddha also have a metaphor where the whole body of moral roles (at least those within the tradition), and good and evil to a raft built for crossing a river? Once one had crossed it would be ridiculous to keep dragging the raft along. Compared to Abrahamic morality, which is far more like laws in modern states (you must do xyz or burn!) the Buddhist ones seem much more instrumental and provisional. >that makes sense. it was tricky for me to fit the Jews into the 'submissive' ethos of Abrahamic religion, but this explains it. The best way to think of Judaism is that in the versions meant for the consumption by goyim that everything that could be described as "based" has been completely inverted and given cucked connotations that weren't originally there, for example "love your neighbor as yourself" in the context of the Old Testament meant "love your fellow Jew" but when peddled to the goyim we see today how it is used for one to be endlessly tolerant of everyone. Likewise the Jews can be seen depicted as completely eradicating goyim and destroying their cultures through force in the Old Testament like in Deuteronomy 7, where it is spoken how God brings the Jews into lands and clears away nations before Him, delivering them unto the Jews. They are told to utterly destroy them. No covenants must be made with them, no intermarriage must take place and their native traditions must be destroyed outright -- "But this is how you must deal with them: break down their altars, smash their pillars, hew down their sacred poles, and burn their idols with fire. For you are a people holy to the Lord your God; the Lord your God has chosen you out of all the peoples on earth to be his people, his treasured possession" (Deut 7:5-6).
the white race is gonna die, i'm fucking calling it now
>>4895 I’m pretty pessimistic as well honestly, but as long as there is a chance to turn things around it should be seized.
>>4895 Remember man, you're born White. For that alone, you should be happy. I'd be the happiest man on Earth if I were born a man who's White.
I might get crucified for this but here goes: >I only care about ethnicity as far as creating a homogeneous national identity I'm still not convinced on the whole master race thing, but I care about my country being white because multiculturalism, and its core, multiracialism will almost always lead to strife and disunity within the national body.
>>4899 I’ve always thought that not buying into the “masterrace” idea is strange, personally. The whole reason why the white race must be preserved is because it is we who have the potential to produce the cream of the crop of humanity, that group of people which has, for better or worse created the foundations of this modern civilization and nearly every invention above the most rudimentary. Similarly we are the most beautiful, the most adaptative, the conquerers who have subjugated entire races in pursuit of our goals. If I was not white it would be hard not to feel envious and inferior. Sadly today it is hard to see why our race is the crowning achievement of Nature, given how we are being degenerated through modern conditions, subversion, miscegenation and other means. The exact reason why whites must be wiped out, replaced and destroyed is exactly because we, without Jew-programming, are much more frequently natural masters
>>4881 >I definitely had the Hagakure in mind when typing these quotes down. It's always interested me how much similarity there is between many warrior traditions. Contrary to what the (((culture industry))) sells us, the traditional warrior is not uncontrolled savagery and passions, but of course precisely the opposite - the true warrior is calm, controlled, and able to subordinate his individualistic tendencies or lower elements to principles, placing his svadharma above mere personhood. This is why Evola speaks of "warrior-like asceticism". It might not be totally coincidental that figures like Mahavira and Siddharta Gautama came from kshatriya lines in this context. true indeed. warrior traditions are often grossly misrepresented, and you have to dig down further to find the truth. >Also I don't think I've heard of Munenori before. Has he written anything worth checking out? yes, he wrote the Life-Giving Sword, aka the Hereditary Book on the Art of War. it belongs on your bookshelf next to the Hagakure and the Book of Five Rings. >Didn't the Buddha also have a metaphor where the whole body of moral roles (at least those within the tradition), and good and evil to a raft built for crossing a river? Once one had crossed it would be ridiculous to keep dragging the raft along. Compared to Abrahamic morality, which is far more like laws in modern states (you must do xyz or burn!) the Buddhist ones seem much more instrumental and provisional. correct. Buddhist ethics are like training wheels that help you learn until you acquire balance, and then become redundant. they're like a cast that sets the bones so they can knit, and then comes off when you're healed. the idea is to condition you until you internalize the ethics, so that you can then intuitively act in the correct manner. the formal rules are a means to an end, not the end itself; this is a dramatic departure from the authoritarian ethos of Abrahamic religion, which as you said demands obedience, and an even greater departure from pharasaic/talmudic legalism. >Judaism I see a significant difference between the Old Testament Hebrews, and the Pharisees & Jews who came after. if you read the Bible, you're struck by a huge shift in Jewish character between Old and New Testaments. the original Hebrews were admirable in many ways, rising to challenges, crafting a sophisticated and uncucked religion and culture. the Pharisees were degenerate relics by comparison. as I've said before, things degenerate based on original qualities, and since the Hebrews emphasized the Law, the Pharisees became legalistic, hair-splitting hypocrites. those same Pharisees who were BTFO by Jesus and the Romans ended up becoming the source of the modern Judaism and the Talmud.
Neinchan hates me for this: >Terrant worship is not helping their cause, quite the contrary in fact. Some don’t seem to get that this battle will be won over the long term. Rushing things would do no good and clearly didn’t learned shit from the kommandant. Probably why he never posted on nein again. I await the bullets.
>>4905 >Rushing things would do no good We don’t have time to wait. The white race is toast if something doesn’t happen in the next few decades. Lemmings still have too much faith in the system since it gives them a modicum of stability and material satisfaction, and they’re so atomized and domesticated at this point that accelerationism is the only option unless we’re going to have to hedge all of our bets on the next economic downturn which will undoubtedly shake normalfags faith in the system. I don’t know why we should listen to some cosplaying e-celeb like Kommandant on this issue honestly, because I highly doubt he’ll ever risk his hide for his race — and I don’t even mean by going for the high score, I mean in any way. To be completely honest I don’t dislike Tarrant, but I have doubts in the type of strategy that he and his several copycats have followed. Something needs done, but only God knows what. This type of stuff is only going to keep happening the longer lemmings remain asleep and docile, and the longer the future looks ever darker for young whites. Mass-shootings are fruitless actions of despair. They accelerate, sure , but wage-slaves are utterly worthless and replaceable
>>4906 Well you’re someone who gets it. Probably better than I. You’re right there’s not a lot of time left, normalfags will only shift side when they are at the brink of total collapse. I am in no way against accelerationism, but it needs to be done right. Which means going for the high scores that counts. For instance I am starting to hear pedo apologists on the state funded radio where I am. If a pewdiepie subscriber would visit this studio I’ll be the first to cheer him on. But when innocents gets the bullet under this context will simply give more reasons for normalfags to ask the Jews to double down, and they’ll gladly do so. So I think your doubts are well placed. In other words: Surgical strikes over retarded and spontaneous acts.
>>4905 OK but you are literally an armchair commander, nobody cares what some nameless do-nothing says when we are losing numbers by the minute. >braces for downvotes lmao
>>4895 Point the gun the other way you shivering stink gash
>>4907 >it needs to be done right. Which means going for the high scores that counts Weirdly enough that is essentially what Tarrant argued that others do in calling for the deaths of Merkel and Sadiq Khan, but instead he goes and shoots up a mosque. Now, this mosque and the city of Christchurch were well known for their ties to radical activity / ISIS so I see this as a completely valid target and do not for a single minute lament the deaths of any of them. My concern of course is with what actually accelerates the collapse of the ZOG system. As was said in the last post, the government might take steps to tighten security after an attack like Tarrant's, but that arguably strengthens the state, I doubt NZ really cares that fifty plebs got blasted at the end of the day except outside of the sense that race relations have to be kept good and further attacks should be prevented. Even more than people though, regardless of importance, there is always the system itself and its structure to keep in mind when discussing acceleration. One can blast government officials all day but they'll put someone new right in their place.
>>4904 >yes, he wrote the Life-Giving Sword, aka the Hereditary Book on the Art of War. it belongs on your bookshelf next to the Hagakure and the Book of Five Rings. I will definitely pick these up some time soon. I have been slowly easing into learning more about Japan recently anyhow, going through the Hagakure, Hojoki, Tsurezuregusa and some of Mishima's works. >which as you said demands obedience, and an even greater departure from pharasaic/talmudic legalism. I've seen it pointed out before that the ethical systems of the pre-Abrahamic Aryans were primarily virtue-based, where one's true inner disposition is central, developing habits of good character was stressed and the basic rule of thumb was "act as a virtuous person would act in your situation", making it flexible and individually focused, and as you put it well a type of training wheels, a means to an end. If we look, in contrast to something like the Ten Commandments are very legalistic and socially-oriented, with morality being based on specific obligations, obligatory irrespective of consequences. Pagan law - which is necessarily in accordance with dharma and non-conflicting custom (nomos) should be focused on bringing out true change in inner dispositions, not merely LARPing along with the proscribed conduct so you don't burn in Hell. Of course that's quite the lofty ideal I set there, and violence and punishment are ultimately king in ensuring the stability of the castes and hierarchies (like the Laws of Manu say, emphasizing the importance of the virtuous king / leader). If everyone was virtuous we wouldn't need law or a state at all, but no one here is that deluded, but it should make us realize the importance of virtuous conduct. >I see a significant difference between the Old Testament Hebrews, and the Pharisees & Jews who came after. The Talmud is definitely a huge departure from the older forms of Judaism. I personally would say that they've of course always been subversive parasites and destroyers of nations, as can be seen if one reads Alfred Rosenberg's The Track of the Jew Through the Ages, but the Talmudic pilpuling kike is truly on another level.
>>4903 I think many people want their race to be preserved because it's theirs and it doesn't have to be logical. I'd like to believe that I would still have a basic race preservation instinct even if I were some hut dwelling nig in africa. Studies show that people are more trusting of others that have similar features to them. I can also speak from experience that it's simply easier to deal with someone when you already have the basics of race and culture in common. It's human nature(TM) to identify with your own kin. When I say I'm not convinced by the master race stuff, it isn't that I deny or even disagree that the white race is by most measures the superior race. I just personally have trouble treating others as though they are inherently inferior to me and I'd like to see a world where all races are uplifted to out standard - in their native lands, of course. If Africa produced a civilization equal to ours, I'd be happy for them. Do I see it happening? Not really,as there are groups objectively better than Africans that still struggle with the basics. I do support the typical fascist policies regarding this stuff though, it's mainly just a personal belief thing.
>>4918 >I will definitely pick these up some time soon. I have been slowly easing into learning more about Japan recently anyhow, going through the Hagakure, Hojoki, Tsurezuregusa and some of Mishima's works. the Book of Five Rings and Life-Giving Sword are complementary in many ways, since Miyamoto Musashi was a wandering ronin, while Yagyu Munenori directly served the Tokugawa shoguns, who patronized his school of swordsmanship. Yamamoto Tsunetomo (the main source of Hagakure) was a samurai of the Saga domain who was somewhat at odds with the shogunate, so he falls into the middle. >Pagan law - which is necessarily in accordance with dharma and non-conflicting custom (nomos) should be focused on bringing out true change in inner dispositions, not merely LARPing along with the proscribed conduct so you don't burn in Hell. true indeed. this seems to be a central distinction between Dharmic and Abrahamic traditions. I've read that when the Buddha was teaching his disciples, the original sangha shared an implicit understanding of ethics and the path to enlightenment; however, they realized that if their teachings were to become a world religion and reach many more sentients, they had to set down their ideas explicitly, thus the Tripitaka was written down. >Of course that's quite the lofty ideal I set there, and violence and punishment are ultimately king in ensuring the stability of the castes and hierarchies (like the Laws of Manu say, emphasizing the importance of the virtuous king / leader). If everyone was virtuous we wouldn't need law or a state at all, but no one here is that deluded, but it should make us realize the importance of virtuous conduct. you need force, but only as a last result. cultivating virtue and leading by example is a better, more subtle way of guiding your people, but there's always a few deviants who cannot be persuaded and must be dealt with. we see this throughout dharmic teachings. the concept of the life-giving sword is that judicious use of violence can ultimately prevent greater violence. in Buddhism, there's the concept of upaya/skillful means, in which acts that would usually cause negative karma may be the right thing to do in specific situations. for example, let's say your house is burning down, and your kids are being spergs and ignoring the obvious danger. so you tell them that the toys they want are outside, tricking them into fleeing the house, and thus saving their lives. another example is the actions Burma has been taking against the Rohingya Muslims who, the media assure us, dindu nuffin. in reality, the Burmese are defending their nation, people and sangha against radical Islam. another meaning of upaya is to guide people towards the truth in terms they can understand. >The Talmud is definitely a huge departure from the older forms of Judaism. yes, I think this is the best way to explain the downright respectable qualities of the OT versus what came later.
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>>4924 >cultivating virtue and leading by example is a better, more subtle way of guiding your people I fully agree. It is shameful how degenerate and scandalous the actions of many of these suited up politicians today are. There is not the smallest amount of virtuous behavior in them. Leaders must be held to stringent ethical codes. If the leaders are corrupt, the people will be corrupted. Gita 3.21 - <Whatever action is performed by a great man, common men follow in his footsteps. And whatever standards he sets by exemplary acts, all the world pursues. The most recent example of this type of man, of course, is Hitler, but it was ever more frequent as we look back into the past when dharma was a more influential and recognized concept. >upaya I will have to read more about this. Now that I think about it, I guess I have heard of Munenori. I had thought that what you said about the sword sounded very familiar, and sure enough he was quoted in the introduction to the copy of the Hagakure that I own: <At times because of one man's evil, ten thousand people suffer. So if you kill that one man to let the tens of thousands live. Here, truly, the blade that deals death becomes the sword that saves lives. >another example is the actions Burma has been taking against the Rohingya Muslims who, the media assure us, dindu nuffin. in reality, the Burmese are defending their nation, people and sangha against radical Islam. I'm glad the Burmese Buddhists have been taking a stand against these people. They are clearly not innocent if one takes even a few minutes to read about what has gone down there (skirmishes between government forces and Rohingya militants, rioting, etc -- I'm sure I could find much more if I were to research the situation in any depth). Reading about what the Muslims did to Buddhists in Afghanistan, Kashmir and the great Buddhist monastery / university of Nalanda has always angered me. I've read that they explicitly targetted the Sangha during their "holy wars" since they were the heart of a healthy Buddhist community. It's especially telling that the modern word for "idol" or "graven image" is بت (bot) for now-Muslim speaking communities such as the Iranians comes from their word that once meant "Buddha".
>>4936 <Whatever action is performed by a great man, common men follow in his footsteps. And whatever standards he sets by exemplary acts, all the world pursues. this is similar to the concept of the chakravartin, or wheel-turning king, a virtuous ruler who uses temporal power to guide the people towards truth (as opposed to the spiritual power of the Buddha and bodhisattvas). >upaya like many other things in Buddhism, it's a subtle concept. it can refer to carefully bending the rules for the greater good, or telling people those parts of the truth they can understand in order to guide them. >I'm glad the Burmese Buddhists have been taking a stand against these people. as am I. and I'm not surprised that the shill media screeches about genocide in response to their proportionate, justified self-defense. >Reading about what the Muslims did to Buddhists in Afghanistan, Kashmir and the great Buddhist monastery / university of Nalanda has always angered me. there's a long history of conflict there, with Muslims being the aggressors of course. while there are respectable qualities in Islam, it's still an Abrahamic faith, which are virulent and aggressive by nature, prone to fundamentalism, and attempt to subvert or destroy all other ideas in their path. compare this to the lack of zealotry in dharmic faiths, and their ability to co-exist with one another such as in India and China. Dharmic religion tends to have a more philosophical character, which is especially true of Buddhism, and this gives it natural resistance to the cancer of radicalism. as an aside, the destruction of the Buddhas of Bamiyan was a despicable act of vandalism, and something I find unforgivable. > the Sangha ... since they were the heart of a healthy Buddhist community. this is worth emphasizing. all Buddhists take refuge in the Three Jewels: the Buddha (enlightened one), dharma (teachings), and sangha (monastic community). so there's the original founder who charted the path to enlightenment, his teachings and discourses, and the community of monks who uphold this. an aspect of dharmic or natural order is a priestly class, who specialize in proper rituals and teaching, and are responsible for guiding the rest. they also unify communities, and prevent the atomization and sense of drift that pervades our society.
>>4938 >this is similar to the concept of the chakravartin, or wheel-turning king, a virtuous ruler who uses temporal power to guide the people towards truth (as opposed to the spiritual power of the Buddha and bodhisattvas). Even though that verse wasn't explicitly in reference to chakravartin, it might as well be, as a true chakravartin would doubtlessly follow such a style of ruling, as would any good leader: <3.20 — Even kings like Janaka and others attained the perfectional stage by performance of prescribed duties. Therefore, just for the sake of educating the people in general, you should perform your work. This verse again mentions the importance of ruling conscious of one's high and vital position. I've seen Emperor Ashoka described as Chakravartin, and I'm inclined to agree honestly, in light of use of Buddhism as a guiding ethic in his later reign, and how he banned Brahmanical animal sacrifice, protected non-food animals, fish and birds, and in general put great effort into propagating and promoting dharma among his people. It would be thousands of years until a ruler even came close to this level, and again not even close given the different cultural environment and the in-creeping of adharma, as we saw with Adolf Hitler's revolutionary bans on vivisection, animal cruely and abuse and his promotion of good conduct and health through his abstention alcohol, tobacco and meat. He certainly would have promoted dharma to his utmost if the Jews had not destroyed and re-enslaved the German people. >while there are respectable qualities in Islam, it's still an Abrahamic faith, which are virulent and aggressive by nature, prone to fundamentalism, and attempt to subvert or destroy all other ideas in their path. compare this to the lack of zealotry in dharmic faiths, and their ability to co-exist with one another such as in India and China. I definitely respect some aspects of Islam, as we've spoken about with its slightly more warrior-oriented tradition, not to mention its stances on alcohol and several other varieties of degeneracy, but much of these are definitely common sense values in my opinion and does not excuse many flaws of the Abrahamic traditions, of course. I have of course no desire to force my beliefs onto the entire planet and all people regardless of race and quality like Abrahamists do, but I think that it is their zealotry has granted them much success in spreading all over the Earth and stomping out other traditions. Hitler recognized this as well in more political terms, though in a more general sense: <“The conviction that one has the right to use even the most brutal weapons always goes hand in hand with fanatical faith in the necessity of the victory of a revolutionary new order upon this earth. A movement that is not fighting for such high aims and ideals, will therefore never resort to the most extreme means.” Still, while I might definitely believe such a thing in regards to politics (i.e. stomping out the opposition, especially those that preach things corrosive to any true Dharmic society), I of course see no problem with a plurality of healthy religious traditions, as, like you said, have coexisted (with a few bumps here and there) in India, China and Japan for centuries now. It's no coincidence at all that the only major religious purge to take place that readily comes to mind done by non-Abrahamics is on Abrahamics, i.e. in Tokugawa Japan when Christians were quite literally purged for being subversives: <The Christian influence, which had managed to gain an incredible following in just a few decades, was seen as a direct threat to life in feudal Japan, and so the shogunate decided to close Japan’s boarders to all but the most minimal of foreign exchange. This policy was known as sakoku (literally “closed country”). Trade was limited to Nagasaki, and only the Dutch, Koreans, and Chinese were tolerated. Any attempts to preach Christian ideals were met with the death penalty. From: “Wabi Sabi: The Japanese Art of Impermanence” by Andrew Juniper <Lest we get the impression that the long Tokugawa tranquility was a natural state of endless harmony, we should be aware of the numerous measures that were taken to keep the peace. [...] And a fourth [policy] was to suppress Christianity in the attempt to rid Japan of the dangerously destabilizing idea that all people were equal in the sight of God. The Tokugawa leaders wanted stability, not equality. They looked to Confucianism to establish a hierarchy of four main social classes. From: “Evanescence and Form” by Charles Shirō Inouye. >as an aside, the destruction of the Buddhas of Bamiyan was a despicable act of vandalism, and something I find unforgivable. When I was getting pics for that post I read on the Wikipedia page some stuff about Muslims back in the day shooting cannons at it too. Imagine seething this hard over a statue. >an aspect of dharmic or natural order is a priestly class, who specialize in proper rituals and teaching, and are responsible for guiding the rest. they also unify communities, and prevent the atomization and sense of drift that pervades our society. All of this is certainly lacking in our current society, which is as adrift as it has ever been as far as I can tell. Even a healthy community centered around a church - as unhealthy as the dogma tought may be over the course of many generations - provides at least something for people to cluster around and gain a benefit from. We're at the point where many people don't know their neighbors a few hundred feet away.
>>4936 >Whatever action is performed by a great man, common men follow in his footsteps. And whatever standards he sets by exemplary acts, all the world pursues. Reminds me of these: “You are there to govern; what use have you for killing? If you desire the good, the people will be good. The virtue of the gentleman is the wind; the virtue of the little people is the grass. The wind on the grass will surely bend it.” “Lead them with government and regulate them by punishments, and the people will evade them with no sense of shame. Lead them with virtue and regulate them by ritual, and they will acquire a sense of shame—and moreover, they will be orderly” Take the Confuciuspill.
>>87 Hitler should have appointed the Strasser brothers as ministers of the economy instead of purging them.
>>5070 It would have never happened. I have a book I bought a while back called Aufbau des Deutschen Sozialismus by Otto Strasser and in the appendix it comes with a brochure from 1930 purporting to be conversation between Hitler and Otto Strasser on various issues. Basically Hitler accuses Strasser of spouting Marxist nonsense, saying his ideas would utterly destroy the economy, that the workers have no right to share in the factories, that Strasser's ideas deny the importance of the individual in history and that, according to Hitler, the sole goal of the economy is the nourishment, clothing and housing of the Volk. To Hitler, at least according to this pamphlet, socialization of businesses / factories is only necessary when they act against the interests of the nation. Interestingly he scoffs at Strasser's talk of capitalism versus socialism, saying <In Wirklichkeit gibt es in der Wirtschaft immer nur ein System: Verantwortung nach oben, Autorität nach unten. "In reality there is only ever one system in the economy: responsibility to the top, authority downward." I don't think he's entirely wrong here tbh. Hitler's ideas were more to "nationalize the people" then there would be no need to nationalize business unless absolutely necessary. The Strassers definitely had some good ideas that I agree with. I particularly liked Otto's idea of deurbanization and reagrianization, but I see no need personally to abolish private property unless it is overwhelmingly in the public interest.
>>5081 I mean in my opinion capitalism is one of the main causes of decadence in today's society, the consumerist lifestyle is what has led to the degradation of our species, that is why economically i am socialistic, i agree that there would have been no way to convince Hitler unfortunately, but just imagine if he was convinced. I am pretty sure Goebbels admired the Strasserists in the NSDAP'S early years until he heard one of Hitler's grand speeches. I am not sure if this is true but i think Himmler also supported the Strasserists very early on in his career.
>>5091 Who said Fascism was against science?

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